Civilization,  History,  Roman Empire

A history of the mental growth of mankind in ancient times (1893) PDF book by John S. Hittel (IV. Rome and early Christianity)

A history of the mental growth of mankind in ancient times (1893) PDF book by  John S. Hittel (IV. Rome and early Christianity)

Rome and early Christianity

Of all national military careers, that of ancient Rome is the most brilliant. She made more campaigns, fought more battles, won more victories, slew and enslaved more enemies, and conquered, annexed, and permanently held more countries than did any other state. In military power, as compared with coeval nations, no other has approached her. Her drill was not so thorough as that of Sparta, but her army was much larger, her sphere of operations far more extensive, her high military efficiency of much longer duration, and her political basis much more solid. Among ancient monarchies, the only one that rivaled Rome in area and population was Persia, which was loose and heterogeneous in its political and military organizations, and short in its life as an extensive empire. In successful assimilation of conquered regions, and in the introduction of a higher culture into subject states, the most notable rival of ancient Rome has been the Quichuan empire. The modern nation which, by the wide dominion of her tongue, her arms, her original system of law, the magnitude of her homogeneous colonies, and the multitude of her heterogen- eous subject provinces, most frequently suggests a comparison with ancient Rome, is England; and the comparison is creditable to both nations.

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